‘Baby’ dancing ‘Samba’

I think this post somehow goes with the previous one on being a model for success. The dumbing down of the people (just see how many views this video has) via Youtube which reminds me of the recent statistic that says Lady Gaga tops the ranks with the most-watched video in history on Youtube. Of course, we couldn’t possibly have anything educational as a top video, now can we?

Here’s the latest sensation, a 6 year old in diapers (I mean, a ‘baby’) dancing to axé (I mean, ‘samba’). Deus me livre

Spelling reform comic – Part 1


(click to enlarge)

In the quadrinho (comic strip) Grump by Orlandeli, last year’s acordo ortográfico (spelling reform) was used as the subject matter of a series he did in January of 2009. Little by little, I will be going over the spelling reform here on Eyes on Portuguese because most sites teaching Portuguese haven’t adjusted their lessons to the new reform. Below, I will translate each quadro (square) of the comic.

Primeiro quadro

“I had an idea. I am going to ask for help from my nephew to understand the agreement. For these kids, it’s a cinch. They are learning now. They don’t have our bad habits because we have been using the old rules for a long time now.”

Segundo quadro

“Hello, nephew. Everything good? By chance, are you in the know about the rules of the spelling reform?”

Terceiro quadro

“Wazzzzuppp Tuimmmm! What’s crackin? Ain’t no thang, yo. Why don’t u roll on thru cuz we can learn dat ish togetha! looool”

“It’s probably best I come up with another idea.”

In the first square of the comic, the words molecada and moleza are used, both of which are slang. Moleque (often misspelled ‘muleque‘) is how you would call a bratty kid in English a “little punk”. It is also used in a general sense to speak of someone who is immature or not yet acting like a man. Since in Portuguese the suffix -ada can be used to speak of a group or of an action (see the end of this post I just linked), molecada means a group of moleques. The second term, moleza, is equivalent to saying something is easy, a cinch, nothing complicated.

For the third square, I improvised in the translation to best represent what it might sound like if an American teenager (influenced by hip-hop culture) would have said it. In Portuguese, the sad state of the nephew’s writing is called miguxês or neo-miguxês, something which I will address in the next post. The second line of the third square is what I would consider the equivalent in English to what was written in the comic.

Thanks to Street Smart Brazil for emailing this comic a while back.

Glossary of a Brazilian translator w/o time to lose

This I found on the SK language school site in the humor section, although most of the humor is in English.

GLOSSÁRIO DE UM TRADUTOR BRASILEIRO QUE ESTUDOU NUM CURSINHO RÁPIDO, PORQUE NÃO TINHA TEMPO A PERDER:

Layout ……………………………… Fora da lei
Go home ……………………………Vá a Roma
He is my son ……………………… Ele e maçon
US Mail ……………………………. Meio dos Estados Unidos
I don’t care ……………………….. Eu não quero
Go ahead ………………………….. Gol de cabeça
Broken heart ……………………… Coração bronqueado
Are you sick? …………………….. Qual e seu CIC?
What time is it? ………………….. Que time é esse?
They go jogging all the time … Eles vão jogar com todo o time
An ice cream ……………………… Crime cometido com frieza
Because ……………………………… Inflamação no bico
Fourteen ……………………………. Pessoa baixa e forte
Corn flakes ………………………… Cornos e frescos
She must go ……………………….. Ela mastigou
It’s too late …………………………. É muito leite
Free shop …………………………… Chopp de graça
Good stuff ………………………….. Boa estufa
A hot day ……………………………. Arrotei.
With noise ………………………….. Conosco
Yellow river ………………………… Ela e horrível.
The boy is behind the door ……. O boi esta berrando de dor.
I’m a man ……………………………. Eu mamei
Once more ………………………….. Onde você mora?
Merry Christmas …………………. Maria foi crismada.
Today’s payday ……………………. Hoje peidei.
In French ……………………………. Em frente.
Netscape …………………………….. Nescafé americano
Fuck ………………………………….. Fuca

When parkour goes soft

I’m thinking quite a lot of people have heard of or seen parkour but what about it’s laid-back cousin, street training? Yes, that’s right, if you are not daring enough to attempt l’art du déplacement then there’s another way you can interact with your surroundings and it’s called street training (what is it called if you become an expert?).

It seems to have started in London and picked up across the pond in none other than Brazil. After seeing a few videos on Youtube, I’m no longer sure it should be called the lazy off-shoot of parkour but rather the chilled-out version of flash mobs…or is it the walking man’s idea of the laying down game? Oh I’m not sure anymore…you crazy kids, you!

Can Cachaçagora compete with this?

Phil over at Cachaçagora recently returned from a trip to Brazil where he visited several distilleries and will slowly but surely release a film about his experience. His only concern? Will his film be able to compete with the likes of this…

But if your fancy is something that is actually done in good taste, either wait a lil’ bit for Phil’s documentary or try the Caipirinha Truffle he spoke about on his site!

Narrow-minded Brazilian Architecture

Somewhere in a small town in Brazil, there’s a pretty narrow-minded architect, I mean don’t get me wrong, I’m sure he’s a real stand up guy but his head was a little in the clouds when he made this one…

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In the small town of Madre de Deus in Bahia, of just about 4 miles squared, there’s a house that’s three stories high and seven feet wide and believe me, it’s an eye-catcher. The residence comes complete with two living rooms, a kitchen, three bedrooms and a varanda. The owners are two 40-somethings, Helenita Queiroz Grave Minho and her husband Marco Antonio and they live with their three children, Helenita’s mother, sister and one dog…go figure!

On the narrow plot of land, when Helenita found herself unemployed, she decided to build a house and rent it out for extra cash. Marco Antonio thought it was a crazy idea but in the end, he gave in and hired a bricklayer who happened to agree with Marco, saying that not even a fridge would fit in a place so narrow. And you know what? He was right. The family ended up having to take apart their appliances and furniture in order to get them in the house.

At the end of two years of work, the owners became satisfied with the house which was bigger than where she lived previously. Upon having this realization, Helenita decided to move to the narrow house and to rent out the old house, which today goes for around $350/month.

The mayor’s office made a fuss at the start but upon seeing the finished work, gave in as well and eventually accepted the new tourism spot where tourists come to sit in front and take pictures. Now, Helenita and Marco Antonio plan to build yet another story, this time without a roof so they can enjoy the sunshine and a nice bbq.

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